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CBD and The Endocannabinoid System

From the National Institute of Health in 2006:

”In the past decade, the Endocannabinoid System has been implicated in a growing number of physiological functions, both in the central and peripheral nervous systems and in peripheral organs.. modulating the activity of the Endocannabinoid System turned out to hold therapeutic properties in a wide range of disparate diseases and pathological conditions..”

CBD is a phytocannabinoid, a type of compound found naturally in plants like hemp. It is not intoxicating and non-addictive. It works with your body’s Endocannabinoid System (ECS). Your ECS helps with inflammation, appetite, energy, stress levels, sleep schedules, and other processes that are central to your well being.

Just discovered in the 1990’s the Endocannabinoid System (ECS) is present throughout your body and is involved with most brain and body functions (including immune and nervous systems).

The word “endo” comes from endogenous, which refers to substances and processes that originate from within a system. In this case, the substances and processes are endocannabinoids and the system they work in is the ECS.

The ECS has one primary job: to regulate the body’s other systems, such as the immune, nervous, and digestive systems. The ECS is the body’s primary regulatory system.

In pets, CBD can help improve anxiety, quality of life, joint functions, neurohealth, skin irritations, and digestive function. The ECS also involves other processes including mood, appetite, muscular function, and sensation.

The ECS is essentially a network of both CB1 and CB2 receptors and the cannabinoids that communicate with nearly all flowing parts of the body and mind.

CB1 receptors are primarily found in the brain, although they are also present along the spinal cord and in some organs. CB2 receptors are dense in immune cells ands in the peripheral nervous system. For this reason, they are thought to play a significant role in the maintenance of inflammation and immune function support.

Photo sourced from Enjoypachamama.com

Photo sourced from LifecannMD.com

Hemp and Marijuana are both types of Cannabis plants. Cannabis is indigenous to Eastern Asia, but has been widely cultivated throughout the world.

The hemp plant can be used to make a variety of commercial and industrial products, including clothing, shoes, rope, textiles, paper, insulation, and biofuel.

Marijuana is only legal for medicinal purposes. It is used in the treatment and management of health conditions including cancer, epilepsy, PTSD, depression, anxiety, menstrual pain, and many other common and even uncommon ailments. Medical marijuana can only be prescribed by a doctor, and purchased in a legal dispensary with a medical card.

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Mitragyna Speciosa (Kratom)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

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Kava Kava (Piper Methysticum)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.